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  • The East African coastal region was divided into three areas: Northern, Central and Southern regions. The original intention was to make regular bi-monthly longlining cruises, alternating northern and southern areas with certain central areas sampled on each cruise but constant mechanical failures in MANIHINE before or during cruises made it impossible to follow the laid down programme; hence the erratic nature of the fishing and sampling heavily biased towards the North East monsoon. This report gives an outline of the major features of the water masses.

  • The physio-chemical environment of the fishing area is rapidly described here; this area is limited by the Malagasy North West coast, the Comores Islands, the Aldabra and Providence Islands. This area is favorable to great tuna concentrations and the following report gives tuna and live-bait fishing results, for Madagascar.

  • In 1981 a Joint Fisheries Research Project of the Republic of Seychelles and the Federal Republic of Germany was carried out in the area of Seychelles. Two chartered trawlers performed 108 valid hauls with one-boat trawl on the Mahe Plateau. Density, total biomass and potential yield of demersal fish was estimated. This report covers the results on bottom fish of the Mahe plateau.

  • The primary purpose of the Galathea Expedition was to explore the ocean trenches in order to find out find out whether life occurred under the extreme conditions prevailing there and if so, to what extent. The second objective was to seek more information, by making greater use of large-scale dredging implements that had been done in the past, as to whether, and to what extent, there are large and active animals in the abyss. The study was also focused on the bottom fauna; to determine the amount of living animals per square metre of sea-bed by a method first employed in Danish waters. The scientific objectives of the expedition were to carry out biological and oceanographical research and make collections, principally in abyssal waters. It also endeavored to spread a knowledge of Danish culture and economic life by means of lectures, films etc.

  • Cruise 5 of the R/V ANTON BRUUN originated from Bombay on January 26 and terminated at Bombay on May 4, 1963. A special program of longline fishing was conducted to study the distribution and abundance of pelagic fishes in the Western Indian Ocean in the period of northeast monsoon. This report presents the station lists, bathythermograph positions and reduced oceanographic, chemical and biological data for Cruise 5. It includes a summary of the longline catch by stations.

  • This is a report of retrospective analysis of Marine mammals, Sea turtles, Seabirds, Elasmobranchs, Vulnerable fishes, Critical habitats, Macrobenthic biota, Biodiversity hotspots and Bycatch assessment in the Western Indian Ocean region

  • During Cruises 2 and 5 of the National Science Foundation research ship Anton Bruun in the Indian Ocean, scientists from the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries Biological Laboratory, Honolulu, conducted long line fishing as part of the fishery phase of the U.S. biological effort in the International Indian Ocean Expedition. The catch consisted of 431 tunas (yellowfin, bigeye, skipjack, and albacore), 124 sharks, and 259 other fish. Additional specimens were taken by trolling (14), by rod and reel (61), and by hand line (14). Physical, chemical and biological data were collected.

  • A deep line-fishing survey of various islands and offshore banks in the Western Indian Ocean was made during January and February 1969 by a Royal Society Expedition whose primary objective was to search for the coelacanth, LATIMERIA CHALUMNAE and thereby extend its known range. The survey was carried out from F.R.V. MANIHINE (109 ft O.A.; 208 G.T.); details are given in the itinerary, the fishing gear, fishing methods and the individual species caught, together with a brief discussion on the effect of depth, height of hooks above sea floor and geographical position on the composition of the catches.

  • The purpose of this study is to assess bycatch and use of vulnerable megafauna (marine mammals, sea turtles and elasmobranchs) in the SWIO artisanal fisheries using interview surveys. This study focuses on areas where bycatch of vulnerable megafauna has been previously identified, suspected or least known as for the east coast of Africa (Mozambique, Tanzania and Kenya) and Mauritius. A total of 961 interview samples were conducted in the region.This study also provides recommendations for future research, management and mitigation of vulnerable megafauna bycatch in artisanal fisheries of the SWIO region

  • The Seychelles Fishing Authority (SFA) launched in November 2004 a research and development program with the assistance of the Institut de Recherche pour le Development (IRD) meant to help the local semi-industrial fishery. The objectives of the program were to study the behavior of the fishing gear under different setting scenarios, study the habitat of the targeted species (depth, temperature) and evaluate the efficiency of various types of bait, which is one of the important constraints in this kind of fishery. Longline trips were conducted with either the SFA research vessel or in collaboration with commercial longliners along the Mahe Plateau. An instrumental line was used to provide data on the behavior of the fishing gear, the vertical distribution of fishes and to collect environmental data. This report presents the results obtained, a discussion on thus research program and perspectives for the future.